Conditions Treated

low-back-pain

About 80% of adults experience low back pain at some point in their lives.

What causes low back pain?

Most low back pain is either caused by a problem within the different parts of your spine or in the way they fit together and move. You can get a backache due to muscle strain or spasm, ligament strains, poor posture or a bulging disc. Rarely it can be due to more serious causes.

 

What should I do if I have acute low back pain?

Apply cold or hot packs locally and take over the counter pain medication like paracetamol and ibuprofen (provided there are no contra-indications) for the first few days. Keep moving gently, avoiding movements that increase pain. Bed rest has not been shown to improve outcomes.  You must seek urgent medical attention if your back pain is associated with problems passing urine or stools, if you have decreased sensation over the genital area or have pain or pins and needles going down both legs.

Can I help you?

Yes. I have worked as an extended scope physiotherapist in the NHS assessing and diagnosing spinal pain and referring patients appropriately for additional investigations or for consultant opinion . I will take a full history and examine you thoroughly before arriving at a diagnosis. Your condition will be explained to you and a treatment plan specific to you will be agreed with you.

Manual therapy (joint mobilisation), soft tissue massage, exercise therapy for improving core strength and acupuncture have all been shown to help recovery from low back pain.

Post-operative-conditions

There is inflammation, pain, muscle soreness and weakness as well as joint stiffness after surgery.

Can I help you?

Yes. Our aim is to return you to full pain-free function. I will assess the range of motion of your joint, muscle strength, sensation, your ability to walk with or without aids and perform activities of daily living. I will plan a treatment programme with you to include strengthening exercises, joint mobility and proprioception and pain relief.

sports-injuries

Why do you get sports injuries?

Sports injuries can occur due to accidents, poor training practices or improper gear. Some people get injured when they are not in proper condition. Not warming up or stretching enough before you play or exercise can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are:

  • Sprains and strains
  • Knee injuries
  • Swollen muscles
  • Achilles tendon injuries
  • Pain along the shin bone
  • Fractures
  • Dislocations.

What should I do if I get a sports injury?

You should see a doctor if

The injury causes severe pain, swelling, or numbness

  • You can’t put any weight on the area
  • An old injury hurts or aches
  • An old injury swells
  • The joint doesn’t feel normal or feels unstable.

If you do not have these signs, use the PRICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) method to relieve pain, reduce swelling, and speed healing. Follow these four steps right after the injury occurs and do so for at least 48 -72 hours:

Do This

Protect

If trauma is severe, protect the injury from further damage. Stop any activity that will aggravate the injury. Use of crutches to take the weight off an injured knee, hip or ankle injury may be necessary. A sling may help to protect an arm or shoulder.

Rest

  • Rest and avoid activities that cause significant pain (for example walking, raising your arm). Allow sufficient rehab time for even small injuries. Reduce your regular activities. If you’ve injured your foot, ankle, or knee, take weight off of it. A crutch can help. If your right foot or ankle is injured, use the crutch on the left side. If your left foot or ankle is injured, use the crutch on the right side.

Ice

Wrap ice cubes in a damp tea towel, use frozen peas or a sports ice pack. Use the ice pack for 15–20 minutes every three to four hours when awake.

Very cold products can cause cold burns so always wrap the ice in a damp cloth.

Compression Apply a firm bandage that does not restrict circulation or cause additional pain. The bandage should cover the whole joint.

Elevation  Raise the injured body part above the level of your heart, if possible in order to help reduce the swelling. Support the limb with cushions or a sling to keep it raised when not walking or using the limb.

Don’t Also, in the first 48-72 hours, avoid

Do not do this

Apply Heat

Increases blood flow and swelling.

Alcohol

Increases blood flow and swelling, and will slow up the healing process.

Massage

Promotes blood flow and can increase swelling and can therefore increase damage if begun too early.

  • Take painkillers and anti-inflammatories (unless contra-indicated)

If your pain or other symptoms get worse, see a doctor.

Can I help you?

Yes. Treatment will be aimed initially at reducing pain and swelling with electrotherapy and soft tissue treatment. Strengthening and stretching exercises and taping will be added as appropriate.

Prevention is better than cure!

Assessment of your sporting action and strengthening the appropriate muscles and advice regarding activity or footwear modification may help prevent a recurrence.

Sciatica

What is sciatica?

The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in your body and runs from the back of your pelvis, through your buttocks and down the back of your legs to your feet.

When it is compressed or irritated you can get pain or numbness or a sensation of pins and needles along a portion of the nerve or it’s entire length.

You may also have low back pain associated with this.

What should I do if I have sciatica?

Apply a cold pack locally, take over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatories (provided there are no contra-indications) and gentle activity to help it initially. Sometimes lying on the pain-free side or lying on your back with a pillow under your leg can help.

You must seek urgent medical attention if you have severe pain or pins and needles down both legs, have loss of bladder or bowel control or reduced sensation in your genital area that occurred along with the sciatica.

Can I help you?

Yes. I can treat your pain with electrotherapy, acupuncture and joint mobilisation as well as sciatic nerve mobilisation. A home exercise programme will be formulated for you. Posture correction and strengthening, stretching exercises as well as movement re-education maybe necessary.

nerve-pain

Every time we move, the nerves in our body also slide or come under tension with the movement. If there is any obstruction to the movement of the nerve due to scar tissue or swelling the nerve tissue can get inflamed and sensitive. This can cause pain, pins and needles or numbness in the area supplied by the nerve.

Can I help you?

Yes. I have the training and experience required to assess the dynamics of nerve mobility and the specific skills required to treat this complex problem with manual therapy and home exercises.

shoulder-pain

Shoulder pain can occur due to lots of different reasons: frozen shoulder, problems with the rotator cuff (the muscles around the shoulder), instability of the shoulder and arthritis. Sometimes it can be due to referred pain from the neck.

Can I help you?

Yes. Where there are so many different causes for shoulder pain, getting a proper diagnosis becomes essential so that treatment is directed to the proper structure and you have reduced pain and improved function as soon as possible. This is where specialist training in manual therapy assessment and treatment techniques makes the difference.

hip-knee-pain

Hip pain can be felt in different areas such as the thigh, the groin the outside of the hip and the buttocks.

What causes Hip Pain? 

The cause for hip pain varies depending on where it is felt. It maybe due to arthritis, bursitis, muscle or tendon strain or degeneration or could be referred from the back.

What should I do if I have hip pain?

If you have had a fall recently and have severe pain or are unable to bear weight through your leg you should see your doctor as soon as possible.

Taking over the counter pain medication and anti-inflammatories( unless contra-indicated) and applying heat packs or rubbing pain relieving gel locally can help improve the pain.

Can I help you?

Yes. Following a comprehensive assessment to identify the cause of your hip pain, I will treat you with joint mobilisation, electrotherapy and acupuncture to reduce pain. I will formulate an exercise program to improve flexibility, strength and balance that is specific to you with your functional needs in mind.

What causes Knee Pain?

The knee is a complex joint that allows movement in many directions and is also weight bearing. For an understanding of the anatomy visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_q-Jxj5sT0g

So knee pain could be due to meniscus cartilage tear or degeneration, ligament sprain, pain due to softening of the cartilage behind the knee cap or arthritis to name a few. Sometimes knee pain and swelling can be due to arthritis.

What should I do if I have knee pain? 

If your pain comes on after injury and you have severe swelling with the knee locking, giving way or an inability to put weight through your leg, you should seek medical advice.

Follow the rest, ice, compression, elevation protocol described under soft tissue injuries and take painkillers and anti-inflammatories (unless contra-indicated)

Start gentle movement of the knee to bend and straighten it whilst in bed and gentle tightening of the knee muscle at the front of your thigh (quadriceps) by pushing your knee down into a towel placed behind your knee. Put your fingers on your quadriceps to feel the muscle tighten during contraction. Hold for 5 seconds and repeat 10 times twice a day. Do not do this if it is painful.

Can I help you?

Yes. I will perform a full assessment of your knee to identify the cause of your pain and explain it to you. A treatment program to reduce pain and improve strength and mobility will be set up. This may include joint mobilisation, taping, electrotherapy, acupuncture and knee strengthening and proprioception exercises.

whiplash

Whiplash is a term that describes a neck injury caused by a sudden movement of the head forwards, backwards or sideways. It usually occurs after a road accident but can also be caused by bungee jumping, adventure rides or contact sports. Sometimes, the symptoms take a while (six to twelve hours) to develop.

What are the symptoms?

Neck pain and stiffness and headache are the most commonly reported symptoms. Sometimes, there maybe pain or pins and needles radiating to the arm or fingers.

What is the cause?

Sudden neck movements can overstretch tendons, ligaments and muscles and injure discs, nerves and joints in the neck.  Injury to any of these tissues can cause your symptoms.

What should I do when I have a whiplash injury?

If your neck feels tender to touch, using moist heat from a damp warm towel or from a heated wheat bag for 5 to minutes followed by local application of a pain relieving gel may help to relax muscles and reduce pain.

It is best to move your neck gently within a comfortable range rather than stopping movement.

Taking painkillers such as paracetamol or anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen (provided there are no contra-indications) is helpful.

If you have any concerns you should seek medical advice as you may need an X-Ray if a fracture is suspected. Ultrasound and MRI scans are not required for most whiplash injuries but maybe needed if your symptoms persist for more than six months or are very severe.

Can I help you?

Yes.  Following a full assessment of your neck, I will explain the findings and give you hands-on therapy to treat your soft tissues or neck joints as required. If there is inflammation, you may benefit from local ultrasound therapy. I can also offer you acupuncture for pain relief.

I will also give you advice regarding self-management including posture and exercise.

neck-pain

Pain in the neck can occur due to many reasons. These could be

Wear and Tear (osteoarthritis) of spinal (facet) joints

Trauma and sports injuries

Wear and tear to intervertebral discs

Whiplash, typically as a result of motoring accidents

What should I do if I have neck pain?

Usually, application of heat with a warm towel or a heated wheat bag helps to relieve muscle spasm.

Apply pain relieving gel or cream to the neck muscles following the heat treatment, this will help to reduce pain.

Take paracetamol or ibuprofen (provided there are no contra-indications)

Keep your neck moving within a comfortable range.

Use a low firm pillow

Can I help you?

Yes.  Following a thorough assessment, I will treat you neck with manual and/or electrotherapy. I can also offer you acupuncture for pain relief.

You will be taught postural correction and specific exercises to improve and maintain your neck movement.

arthritis

Arthritis is a common condition that causes pain and inflammation in a joint. In the U.K around 10 million people suffer from arthritis. The two most common types of arthritis are

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

Osteoarthritis  (wear and tear arthritis) is the most common type of arthritis in the U.K affecting over 8 million people. It usually affects adults in their late forties onwards or those with a family history of the condition. Sometimes if a joint is affected by injury it can develop arthritis earlier.

What causes the symptoms?

Osteoarthritis initially affects the cartilage (the strong, smooth surface that lines the bones) and allows joints to move easily. When the cartilage wears away, it makes movement more difficult than usual, leading to pain and stiffness. As the cartilage lining starts to roughen and thin out, the lining of the joint called the synovium may get inflamed causing the joint to swell.

Severe loss of cartilage can lead to bone rubbing on bone, altering the shape of the joint and forcing the bones out of their normal position.

What should I do if I have osteoarthritis?

If you have joint swelling, applying a cold pack can help reduce pain and swelling.

Take painkillers and anti-inflammatories (provided there are no contra-indications)

If it is affecting a weight bearing joint such as your hip or knee avoid excessive activity or try using a walking stick to take the weight off your joint.

Can I help you?

Yes. While there is no cure for arthritis, treatment is aimed at reducing the symptoms of pain, swelling and stiffness.  I will advice you on various ways in which to protect your joints. When you have joint pain and swelling your muscles are inhibited and tend to weaken. Doing appropriate muscle strengthening exercises helps to protect joints by reducing the stress on them.

Rheumatoid Arthritis: This is an auto-immune condition which causes inflammation of the lining of a joint, which is called the synovial membrane. The affected joint gets hot, red swollen and very painful. Rheumatoid arthritis usually affects more than one joint at a time.

If you have joint pain, swelling and stiffness on waking that lasts for more than half an hour, you should see your G.P. Early diagnosis and management of Rheumatoid arthritis leads to better outcomes.

What causes the symptoms?

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system starts attacking your body’s own tissues instead of germs and viruses, which causes inflammation. Inflammation normally dies down fairly quickly but in rheumatoid arthritis it becomes a long-term (chronic) process.

What should I do if I have rheumatoid arthritis?

Your doctor will request blood tests and X-Rays and refer you to a specialist Rheumatologist if he suspects that you may have Rheumatoid arthritis.

You will be treated with specific medicines.

Can I help you?

Yes. Looking after your joints is very important in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Exercise is an important part of this, and I can suggest different exercises that may help ease your symptoms, strengthen muscles and stretch your joints safely. I can also give you advice regarding ways in which to protect your joints.

11. What is a soft tissue injury?

When you injure your musclestendon and ligaments you have a soft tissue injury

Tendons are fibrous bands that attach muscles to bone

Overstretching of muscle and tendons is called a ‘strain’.

Ligaments are fibrous bands that hold bones together..

Overstretching of ligaments is referred to as a ‘sprain’

You can expect good recovery from most soft tissue injuries. The length of time depends on your age, general health and severity of the injury.

What are the symptoms?

When soft tissue is damaged, there is usually immediate pain along with immediate or delayed swelling (excessive swelling can slow the healing process).

Stiffness is also very common as a result of the trauma and swelling. Bruising may also develop after 24-48 hours.

With severe trauma, there may also be a fracture. As with all severe trauma it is best to go direct to A&E for a detailed diagnosis.

What can I do?

In the first 48-72 hours follow the PRICE protocol along with gentle pain free movement. This is described under Sports Injuries. You may require painkillers to help with pain relief.

Minimise using the affected area the area and initially avoid stretching which could further weaken the damaged tissue. After a few days when the swelling has reduced, slowly increase your activity levels as tolerated, unless your physiotherapist advises you against it.

If you have had a significant injury, you may need to avoid certain activities or movements until adequate healing has taken place. Again, your Physiotherapist will advise you on the most suitable exercises.

Can I help you?

Yes. I can advise you, provide hands-on treatment, electrotherapy and exercises to improve muscle strength, joint flexibility and balance. These exercises will help you recover quicker, help reduce pain and reduce the chance of the injury recurring.

Soft-Tissue

What is a soft tissue injury?

When you injure your musclestendon and ligaments you have a soft tissue injury

Tendons are fibrous bands that attach muscles to bone

Overstretching of muscle and tendons is called a ‘strain’.

Ligaments are fibrous bands that hold bones together..

Overstretching of ligaments is referred to as a ‘sprain’

You can expect good recovery from most soft tissue injuries. The length of time depends on your age, general health and severity of the injury.

What are the symptoms?

When soft tissue is damaged, there is usually immediate pain along with immediate or delayed swelling (excessive swelling can slow the healing process).

Stiffness is also very common as a result of the trauma and swelling. Bruising may also develop after 24-48 hours.

With severe trauma, there may also be a fracture. As with all severe trauma it is best to go direct to A&E for a detailed diagnosis.

What can I do?

In the first 48-72 hours follow the PRICE protocol along with gentle pain free movement. This is described under Sports Injuries. You may require painkillers to help with pain relief.

Minimise using the affected area the area and initially avoid stretching which could further weaken the damaged tissue. After a few days when the swelling has reduced, slowly increase your activity levels as tolerated, unless your physiotherapist advises you against it.

If you have had a significant injury, you may need to avoid certain activities or movements until adequate healing has taken place. Again, your Physiotherapist will advise you on the most suitable exercises.

Can I help you?

Yes. I can advise you, provide hands-on treatment, electrotherapy and exercises to improve muscle strength, joint flexibility and balance. These exercises will help you recover quicker, help reduce pain and reduce the chance of the injury recurring.